10 things you should do first 30 days in a new job

10 things you can do in the first 30 days of a new job Starting a new role can be stressful. You’re the newbie who’s trying to learn the ropes, remember everyone’s name – and figure out as much as you can without asking stupid questions. We’ve all been there! The great news is, there’s…

10 things you can do in the first 30 days of a new job

Starting a new role can be stressful. You’re the newbie who’s trying to learn the ropes, remember everyone’s name – and figure out as much as you can without asking stupid questions. We’ve all been there!

The great news is, there’s lots you can do in the weeks ahead to make a good impression and hit the ground running. Here are our top ten suggestions.

1. Prepare your one-line ‘who I am’ pitch

You’ll be meeting a lot of people in the first 30 days of a new job, so have a one-liner ready to go that explains to people who you are, where you’ve come from, what your particular skillset is – and what your new role is. It’ll help your co-workers place you in the organisation and you’ll find it easier if you have that ‘pitch’ ready to go.

2. Start a conversation (or three)

Bumping into people you don’t know is going to happen – probably in the kitchen while you’re dunking a tea-bag – and it’s worth having a few conversation starters up your sleeve. If they’re open to a chat, keep it light: pick their brains about where to get good coffee or a sandwich, or ask about their weekend. And talking about TV shows you’re currently into never fails, either!

3. Say yes to any invitations

Always take the opportunity to make new friends at work. If someone invites you to grab a coffee, go for lunch or join the team at the pub after work, say yes. Socialising with your peers is just as important as getting to know your boss and managers – and bonding with your co-workers will definitely make the working environment more fun and less lonely.

4. Talk about expectations

Those first few weeks are often about meeting with key managers you may report to, and finding out the daily, weekly and monthly expectations gives you clarity from the get-go. Say something like, ‘I understand I’ll be reporting to you on XYZ. It would be helpful if we could talk through your expectations going forward, so I’m really clear on what I need to deliver.’

5. Figure out what’s important to your manager

Is there some kind of performance metric your work will be judged on? If so, find that out too, so you have a better chance of success in your role. It’s also good to glean the little things your boss cares about – like people being bang on time, or providing regular updates on projects. Figuring out what’s important can help you work towards becoming a valued team member.

6. Ask all the questions

Absorbing all the knowledge you can is essential in that first month – so be proactive in finding and talking to the right people who can help you get to grips with the role. Don’t worry about annoying people; asking questions actually shows you’re open to learning and getting up to speed quickly, which your co-workers will welcome.

7. Try to remember people’s names

One reason we forget names is because we weren’t listening when the person first told us theirs, say experts. But memorising people and their name as soon as you meet them is a great skill to have: it can build rapport and help you make a good impression. So, when meeting someone for the first time, focus your attention only on them, and repeat their name while you shake their hand: ‘Nice to meet you, Betsy’. Repeating the person’s name again in the conversation, and when you say goodbye to that person, also helps solidify it in your memory.

8. Learn how the company ticks.

Although you may have researched your employer prior to the interview, now you’re in the door you can get more insights into the overall company culture. Do they promote work-life balance but expect you to work late? Are there any company activities you should attend? How can you take advantage of any benefits? Finding out all you can will help you determine if this is a place you’ll want to work long-term or not, too.

9. Demonstrate your value

You were hired for a reason, so make sure you’re bringing your expertise to the table whenever possible. Your manager may start you off slowly, rather than throwing you in the deep end on a complex job or project – but as soon as you’ve finished those tasks, ask for more, contribute to any team problem solving, or come up with fresh ideas to present to your boss. It’s a great way to impress them off the bat.

10. Ask for feedback

You’re the new kid on the block and that’s always a learning curve – so if you’re not given much feedback at first, ask for it. You could approach your boss once a week at first, to see how you’re going and the areas in which you might need to improve. It’ll show you’re willing to do what it takes to make your manager’s life easier, which will be appreciated.