Etiquette Rules for Job Interviews in Healthcare

Interviewing for a healthcare role can be daunting and even the most socially aware and experienced among us can make a blunder out of nerves. When you’re interviewing for a healthcare position, you’re not just being assessed on your capability for the job, you’re also being judged on your social skills, manners, and general presentation….

Interviewing for a healthcare role can be daunting and even the most socially aware and experienced among us can make a blunder out of nerves. When you’re interviewing for a healthcare position, you’re not just being assessed on your capability for the job, you’re also being judged on your social skills, manners, and general presentation. This makes interview etiquette an essential part of the process if you want to be successful.

In case your interviewing skills need a bit of a brush up, here are some etiquette guidelines that all interviewees should follow.

 

  • Be punctual but not too early. Being late is a big no-no when you have an interview but being too early can appear just as rude. As a rule, try to arrive early but by no more than 15 minutes at the most.

 

  • Don’t bring any food or drink with you to the interview. Turning up with a coffee makes you look too relaxed and like you aren’t taking the job seriously enough. Chances are you will be offered water and tea or coffee when you arrive.

 

  • Keep your phone switched off and out of sight during the interview. Remember to switch it off completely instead of just turning it to vibrate mode, which can still be a distraction.

 

  • Don’t interrupt your interviewer. This is a common nervous habit but it’s one that can unfortunately make you look impatient and rude. Listen carefully while they ask a question and pause before responding. This demonstrates confidence and lets you think before you speak.

 

  • Send a thank you note to your interviewer. Thank them for their time and re-state how interested you are in the position. Thank you notes can make a great impression on an interviewer and really help you stand out from other candidates.

 

  • Be aware that you’re potentially being observed from the moment you enter the building to the moment you leave. This means you should be on your best behaviour throughout. Be courteous and friendly to everyone you meet, and don’t do anything you wouldn’t want your interviewer to see you do until you’re well out of sight of the building.

Making a great impression at an interview takes more than an impressive resume and lengthy work history. A potential employer will be evaluating your interpersonal skills and presentation as much as they look at your job skills and experience. Create a positive impression by demonstrating good etiquette, and you’ll have a much better chance of getting the job.

If you are currently seeking a new opportunity, please contact one of our specialist consultants to discuss your situation.