Interview Etiquette for Employers

There are many ways a job candidate can blot their copybook through rude, sloppy or inappropriate behaviour in an interview. But have you stopped to consider your own interview technique in retail recruitment? Employers and hirers can be so focused on the presentation of their candidates, they forget to assess their own. So, when you…

There are many ways a job candidate can blot their copybook through rude, sloppy or inappropriate behaviour in an interview.

But have you stopped to consider your own interview technique in retail recruitment? Employers and hirers can be so focused on the presentation of their candidates, they forget to assess their own.

So, when you need to fill those job vacancies, try these tips for making every interview as pleasant as possible – for both candidate and recruiter.

Offer a welcoming setting

Nobody will give their best interview in a shoe cupboard or obviously uncomfortable room. Make the interview space as light and well heated or cooled as you can and try not to keep your candidates waiting too long.

Keep a welcoming demeanour

It’s a retail job interview, not a test of stamina or endurance. Don’t try any weird or challenging techniques to see how the candidate reacts under stress – they will be just as likely to trip up if they’re relaxed as if they’re stressed. A relaxed, respected candidate will generally show you more of their true nature anyway.

Don’t interrogate or pester your candidates

Beware the barrage of questions. Ask strategic, clear questions, and allow the space and time needed for the candidate to frame and deliver their answers.

Watch your body language

Don’t just concentrate on your candidate’s body language – assess your own. Smile, keep an open posture turned towards the interviewee, and be receptive to their words. Frowning, turning away, gazing out of the window or burying yourself in your papers are neither useful nor polite ways of proceeding.

Frame sensitive questions about retail jobs carefully

  • Ask if the candidate can work the specified hours, rather than whether they’ll have childcare problems.
  • Ask if the candidate speaks any other language, rather than asking them their native language.
  • Ask if the candidate can lift heavy weights on a consistent basis, rather than if their previous back injury has healed now.
  • Ask if the candidate can perform essential functions of the job, rather than if and how they are disabled, and ensure they are aware of all aspects of the job.

Even in casual conversation, keep your discussion related to the job rather than straying into areas of race, religion, disability, marital status and sexual orientation.

If you respect your candidate, they leave with a positive impression of your company, and know the behavioural standard expected if they get the job.

Isn’t that what they call a win-win?

If you have any current recruitment needs, please contact one of our dedicated retail recruitment specialists.